Style Glossary

Jacobean

JacobeanJacobean interiors can be described as luxurious, rich and ornate. Oak is the dominant material used on tables and chairs, and the wood is always intricately carved – table legs and banister posts are accentuated. Royal and family coats of arms are often incorporated into furnishings. Furniture isn’t the only beautifully detailed element – plasterwork ceilings and grand marble fireplaces are also modifying elements of Jacobean interior design. Silver is a commonly used material, and it’s typically used to channel a marine motif. Silver sculptures of dolphins, mermaids and shells are interspersed throughout Jacobean design.

Image of Jacobean bar from Cravotta Interiors

Japanese

JapaneseJapanese interiors give off a serene, peaceful feel thanks to a simple design style. Much like minimalist design, Japanese interiors put a focus on uncluttered spaces, clean lines and balance. Sliding doors are often used to create a seamless transition from one room to the next. Natural wood and stone are heavily used throughout the home. Outdoor elements like rock gardens, fountains, ferns and bamboo are also utilized. Furniture is large and usually square or rectangular and pieces like chairs and sofas sit low to the ground.

Image of Japanese bedroom from Zen Door Company

Lake House

Lake houseLake houses focus on relaxation and simplicity, which is exactly what the lake house home design style reflects. These interiors boast a casual, carefree atmosphere associated with lakeside living. Natural light is maximized with beautiful picture windows and skylights to show off breathtaking outdoor scenery. To keep the focus on nature, simple color palettes consisting of a blend of neutrals are used throughout the home. All-white color palettes are also common among the lake house style. Existing architectural elements like exposed wood ceiling beams and brick walls are embraced and shown off. Elements found in nature are used for decorating – you might see greenery, animal prints, or driftwood throughout a lake house style home.

Image of Lake House family room from Girl Meets Lake

Machine Age

Machine AgeMachine Age interiors share similar characteristics to mid-century modern and industrial homes. There is a focus on raw materials like metal and exposed wood, both of which help create cool, sleek and clean interiors. Texture is important in Machine Age design, as it adds character to the home. For instance, a room with brick walls, stone floors and stainless steel countertops would fit the Machine Age aesthetic. This décor style has a more vintage flair than industrial interiors do, therefore you’ll frequently see big statement pieces like old road signs, train station clocks and studio lamps. Color palettes are always neutral and usually contain a mix of grays, whites, blacks and browns as well as metallic such as metal, bronze, copper and nickel.

Image of Machine Age lamp from Industrial Artifacts

Medieval

MedievalMedieval interior design can be compared to gothic interiors, as they tend to have similar design elements like rich wood accents and decorative stone. Much like castles, Medieval interiors are rich in detail, boasting large, heavy and ornately carved wood benches, chairs and tables. The upholstery on window treatments, beds and sofas feature luxurious fabrics such as velvet, silk and damask. Medieval color palettes are just as bold as the detailing in the house. Dramatic reds, greens, golds and blues can be seen on everything from upholstery to rugs and other decorative items.

Image of Medieval wine cellar from Studio 10 Interior Design